Obsessions and Interests

3,954 notes

5 Common Story Problems with Simple Fixes

fictionwritingtips:

Our stories are often plagued with these common story problems, but if we don’t know how to fix them, we’ll never improve our writing. It’s important that you remember you don’t need to scrap your novel if you keep having the same issues over and over again. Hopefully this list will help you pinpoint what’s going on and provide ways for you to improve your novel.

Problem: Unmotivated Characters

If you’re having trouble figuring out where your story should go next, the problem could be with unmotivated characters. Characters aren’t in your novel just so you can push them around every once in a while and make them do things. They need to develop over time and keep your story going in the right direction.

Solution:

Work on your character’s wants, goals, and motivations. You need to figure out what’s driving your character if you want them to do anything. Where do they want to end up? What’s standing in their way? What’s their plan? Who will help them? Think about everything your character will need to do to resolve your novel. Focus on what they want and what motivates their actions and your characters will stop being dull and lifeless.

Problem: Boring First Chapters

A boring first chapter is dangerous because you want to captivate your audience right away. You don’t want to lose readers just because of this, but sometimes it happens.  You should give enough information to keep your readers interested, while also keeping them intrigued enough to figure out what happens next.

Solution:

Putting emotion into your scenes from the beginning will not only help set the tone, but we’ll get an immediate understanding of your world. The best advice I can give is to construct a scene that helps us best understand your character. If they’re on the run, show us that they’re being chased. If they’re sad and lonely, construct a scene that lets us feel their isolation. You don’t necessarily need to open your book with action, but you do need to introduce the conflict. Think about what your character wants and go from there. Think of your first chapter as an introduction to an essay. You don’t go right into the points immediately, but you set us up for something good.

Problem: Plot Holes

Writers worry about forgetting to include important information in their novel that’s necessary to the plot. If you’re discovering that readers often point out plot holes in your story, maybe it’s time to reevaluate how you plan your novel.

Solution:

Pre-planning or prewriting your novel often solves any plot hole problems. If you take the time to write out important scenes so you don’t forget them, your story will become stronger. However, if you’re not someone who likes to do so much planning, you can tackle plot holes during the editing phase. Take notes when you’re editing so that you can catch these plot holes and figure out where you can add necessary information. A plot hole does not always mean your novel needs loads of reworking, but it is something you need to take the time to fill in.

Problem: Poor Pacing

Poor pacing can ruin a novel, but luckily it’s something you can tackle head on before you even start writing your story. Good pacing helps add tension to your novel and helps you make sure there’s enough rising and falling action to keep your story interesting.

Solution:

Planning out your novel ahead of time also helps solve pacing problems. You can create a timeline that helps you keep track and plan out when you want certain things to happen. Read up on story arcs and try to plan out your scenes accordingly. If you’re already done with your novel and you notice poor pacing, try rearranging scenes or spreading out the action.

Problem: Info-Dumping

A very common writing problem is info-dumping. This is when you tell your readers loads of information at a time without showing them anything important. Info-dumps usually occur in first chapters of novels, but they can happen anytime during the course of your story. Info- dumps can drag down your story and bore your readers.

Solution:

Cut out long paragraphs where you explain what’s going on in your novel and show your readers instead. Avoid over explaining things that can be explained through action. Letting your audience figure things out instead is a much more satisfying reading experience and it lets your readers connect with your characters on a deeper level.

-Kris Noel

~ C

(via emmaswanned)

Filed under writing

11,703 notes

idontfindyouthatinteresting:

haanigram:

kaltspiegel:

I made a compilation of scenes from the entire first season of Hannibal and removed eveything that had people in it.
I present you… Hannibal. Without people.

Music by David Firth

this is so beautiful and smart every fannibal needs to spend a few minutes watching this whole video, it’s perfect, just push play.

This is absolutely amazing!

~ C

(via bonesbuckleup)

Filed under Hannibal blood I just really like shows that are pretty

910 notes

repair-her-armor:

So I read this article and it was illustrated with tons of good armors and good outfits! 

Like this one (art by Jason Chan)

image

or this one (S. Ross Brown), 

image

or (Jason Chan again)

image

or (Brenoch Adams)

image

I could put them all really!

I’m not sure if we’ve run this article before, but now’s as good a time as any to do so (or re-do so, as the case may be?) because it really is a good article. And hey! The accompanying art is also really good! Good all around!

-Staci 

~ C

(via cleolinda)

Filed under women in armour art armour

6,940 notes

eringoblah:

I keep this blog focused on my art and animation work, but just this once, I’m going to go on a slight tangent to talk about how uncommonly kind Peter Capaldi is.
Backstory brief: Last year longtime fan f***yespetercapaldi (speaking of uncommonly kind) spearheaded a Twelfth Doctor fanart/letter/photo collab on Tumblr and compiled all the contributions into a scrapbook, which she mailed to PCap for Christmas. More recently, he responded and those of us who contributed found ourselves receiving painted and autographed postcards like mine shown above.
Now, he could have drawn one picture, made photocopies for everyone and signed those and we would have been THRILLED. He didn’t do that.
He drew and painted this design multiple times by hand. He made sure each person had an individual, personally made piece. For a bunch of artists who know how much time and effort goes into our own art, it’s incredibly touching and unexpected. (And for me, he wrote both the worst and best thing he could have written, because drawing is hard but it’s worth keeping at it.)
Point is, Peter Capaldi is not just taking on his dream role; he’s aware that he’s just inherited a huge worldwide fanbase, and is trying his very hardest to do right by them. It’s a masterclass in class, so shoutout to the Doctor, for being the Doctor for us, before series 8 has even aired.
And now I have to keep drawing, dammit. Doctor’s orders.

~ C

eringoblah:

I keep this blog focused on my art and animation work, but just this once, I’m going to go on a slight tangent to talk about how uncommonly kind Peter Capaldi is.

Backstory brief: Last year longtime fan f***yespetercapaldi (speaking of uncommonly kind) spearheaded a Twelfth Doctor fanart/letter/photo collab on Tumblr and compiled all the contributions into a scrapbook, which she mailed to PCap for Christmas. More recently, he responded and those of us who contributed found ourselves receiving painted and autographed postcards like mine shown above.

Now, he could have drawn one picture, made photocopies for everyone and signed those and we would have been THRILLED. He didn’t do that.

He drew and painted this design multiple times by hand. He made sure each person had an individual, personally made piece. For a bunch of artists who know how much time and effort goes into our own art, it’s incredibly touching and unexpected. (And for me, he wrote both the worst and best thing he could have written, because drawing is hard but it’s worth keeping at it.)

Point is, Peter Capaldi is not just taking on his dream role; he’s aware that he’s just inherited a huge worldwide fanbase, and is trying his very hardest to do right by them. It’s a masterclass in class, so shoutout to the Doctor, for being the Doctor for us, before series 8 has even aired.

And now I have to keep drawing, dammit. Doctor’s orders.

~ C

(via dunderklumpen)

Filed under adorable Peter Capaldi I'm sorry my hatred of Steven Moffat means I'm not watching the show anymore you seem like a great guy Doctor Who cast